(Source: lalobalocaart)

evepostapple:

Zain’s Vegan & Gluten Free Zucchini Lasagna! 

Ingredients:
5 organic zucchini
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup fresh basil 
2 cups raw cashews (soaked overnight preferably in water)
3 cups tomato sauce of your choice (I make mine homemade with vegetable stock, fresh heirloom tomatoes & oregano)
2 cups veggies of your choice (I like orange peppers, mushrooms & onion)
11/2 tbsp nutritional yeast
Crystal salt & fresh ground pepper to taste
11/2 cups @daya vegan cheddar cheese or non-vegans swap for cheese of your choice 

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°

2. Trim ends off zucchini slice about 1/16 thick with a mandoline 

3. Place on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet. 

4. Brush with oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 10 minutes until zucchini is soft then remove and let cool.

5. Meanwhile blend cashews, about 1/2 cup water, nutritional yeast, basil and a pinch of salt until smooth.

6. Line a sprayed loaf pan (I use one that is 9 inches)with a layer of zucchini, 1/8 cup tomato sauce, 1 cup of the veggies of your choice, half the cashew cheese and 1/2 cup daya cheese or cheese of your choice.
Cover with another layer of zucchini and repeat until loaf pan is full. Top with remaining tomato sauce and remaining daya cheese or cheese of your choice.

7. Bake for 45 minutes. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving. This recipe tastes amazing cold too on those hot summer days!

evepostapple:

Zain’s Vegan & Gluten Free Zucchini Lasagna!

Ingredients:
5 organic zucchini
2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
1/2 cup fresh basil
2 cups raw cashews (soaked overnight preferably in water)
3 cups tomato sauce of your choice (I make mine homemade with vegetable stock, fresh heirloom tomatoes & oregano)
2 cups veggies of your choice (I like orange peppers, mushrooms & onion)
11/2 tbsp nutritional yeast
Crystal salt & fresh ground pepper to taste
11/2 cups @daya vegan cheddar cheese or non-vegans swap for cheese of your choice

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 350°

2. Trim ends off zucchini slice about 1/16 thick with a mandoline

3. Place on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet.

4. Brush with oil and season with salt and pepper. Bake for 10 minutes until zucchini is soft then remove and let cool.

5. Meanwhile blend cashews, about 1/2 cup water, nutritional yeast, basil and a pinch of salt until smooth.

6. Line a sprayed loaf pan (I use one that is 9 inches)with a layer of zucchini, 1/8 cup tomato sauce, 1 cup of the veggies of your choice, half the cashew cheese and 1/2 cup daya cheese or cheese of your choice.
Cover with another layer of zucchini and repeat until loaf pan is full. Top with remaining tomato sauce and remaining daya cheese or cheese of your choice.

7. Bake for 45 minutes. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving. This recipe tastes amazing cold too on those hot summer days!

nitanahkohe:

lady-chevy85:

nitanahkohe:

A mini documentary on sex trafficking of Native women, with particular focus on Minnesota (Native women & girls are frequently sold on the shipping boats that travel around the Lakes, and have been for decades).

"People don’t see Native American women as humans. They see them as punching bags. Or something novel, like a new toy—it’s fun at first, but afterwards you throw it away." —Sarah El Fakahany, Sexual Assault Advocate at Minnesota Indian Women’s Resource Center

This is very sad, I didn’t know that the Native American women and girls were part of sex trade and prostitution.

it is a very big problem, much bigger than many people realize or want to admit, even among Native communities. if you go to a truck stop anywhere near tribal communities late at night, you will see young Native girls who have been trafficked. Minnesota, Arizona, South Dakota, North Dakota, Montana, Oregon, & Washington are particularly bad. here’s some more resources on sex trafficking of Native women:

(via themindislimitless)

Blowback on the Border: America's Child Refugee Crisis

holygoddamnshitballs:

After three years of relative silence, the U.S. press has finally “discovered” the crisis of tens of thousands of unaccompanied minors piling up on the U.S. border. Although the coverage often began with moving stories of the hardships these young migrants faced, it soon turned ugly….

(Source: The Huffington Post)

Did you know, you can quit your job, you can leave university? You aren’t legally required to have a degree, it’s a social pressure and expectation, not the law, and no one is holding a gun to your head. You can sell your house, you can give up your apartment, you can even sell your vehicle, and your things that are mostly unnecessary. You can see the world on a minimum wage salary, despite the persisting myth, you do not need a high paying job. You can leave your friends (if they’re true friends they’ll forgive you, and you’ll still be friends) and make new ones on the road. You can leave your family. You can depart from your hometown, your country, your culture, and everything you know. You can sacrifice. You can give up your $5.00 a cup morning coffee, you can give up air conditioning, frequent consumption of new products. You can give up eating out at restaurants and prepare affordable meals at home, and eat the leftovers too, instead of throwing them away. You can give up cable TV, Internet even. This list is endless. You can sacrifice climbing up in the hierarchy of careers. You can buck tradition and others’ expectations of you. You can triumph over your fears, by conquering your mind. You can take risks. And most of all, you can travel. You just don’t want it enough. You want a degree or a well-paying job or to stay in your comfort zone more. This is fine, if it’s what your heart desires most, but please don’t envy me and tell me you can’t travel. You’re not in a famine, in a desert, in a third world country, with five malnourished children to feed. You probably live in a first world country. You have a roof over your head, and food on your plate. You probably own luxuries like a cellphone and a computer. You can afford the $3.00 a night guest houses of India, the $0.10 fresh baked breakfasts of Morocco, because if you can afford to live in a first world country, you can certainly afford to travel in third world countries, you can probably even afford to travel in a first world country. So please say to me, “I want to travel, but other things are more important to me and I’m putting them first”, not, “I’m dying to travel, but I can’t”, because I have yet to have someone say they can’t, who truly can’t. You can, however, only live once, and for me, the enrichment of the soul that comes from seeing the world is worth more than a degree that could bring me in a bigger paycheck, or material wealth, or pleasing society. Of course, you must choose for yourself, follow your heart’s truest desires, but know that you can travel, you’re only making excuses for why you can’t. And if it makes any difference, I have never met anyone who has quit their job, left school, given up their life at home, to see the world, and regretted it. None. Only people who have grown old and regretted never traveling, who have regretted focusing too much on money and superficial success, who have realized too late that there is so much more to living than this.

Wunderkammer: Did You Know

ahhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh

(via wethinkwedream)

I hope everyone reads this

(via dirtyflowerchild)

(via appalachiaseeds)

vufus:

"Tree of Life"
Artist:Marcia Baldwin

vufus:

"Tree of Life"

Artist:Marcia Baldwin

(via filthy-hippie-vibes)

http://themindislimitless.tumblr.com/post/91816329308/tomarza-instead-of-buying-solidarity-t-shirts

tomarza:

instead of buying solidarity t-shirts that don’t help palestinians at all, please consider buying from the hebron palestinian women’s embroidery cooperative.

Women in Hebron is a Palestinian nonprofit fair trade cooperative under the Idna Cooperative Association for…

thepeoplesrecord:

The overwhelming silence of Gaza’s streets
July 14, 2014

Mahmoud Darwish, the great Palestinian poet, once called Gaza “an incomparable moral treasure for Arabs.” No matter what our enemies do, Gaza will “not repeat lies and say ‘yes’ to invaders,” he wrote.

Here is the truth about what our Israeli invaders have done to us in recent days. They havekilled more than 170 people. More than thirty of them are children.

They have injured more than one thousand. Most of our victims are civilians.

Everyone in Gaza is a potential target for Israel’s warplanes. We can all be killed — whether we stay at home, go to work, go to a marketplace or pray in a mosque.

No ambition for martyrdom

In Gaza, we call our victims “martyrs,” whether they intended to die or not. Some people in the West find this puzzling. We make no apology for doing so. We have always believed that those who are killed by the Israeli occupation will be rewarded by God in paradise.

I have not been trying to become a martyr. I am a journalist trying to do my job.

Last week, I was trying to ensure that the voices of Gaza are heard in the outside world, something I do all the time.

While I was taking a taxi home after conducting some interviews, I narrowly missed an Israeli drone attack on a motorcycle. Two martyrs died instantly in that attack.

Protecting my children is not easy.

Each day I go to a market near where I live, so that I can buy some food for my family. Munir, my fifteen-year-old son, accompanied me on one of these recent visits. We had to race home. Munir started running first, as we heard the thunderous roar of an Israeli airstrike. I felt compelled to run, too.

When we got back home, I started thinking about what could have happened. What if the Israelis had bombed us?

Too much suffering

Too many people have already lost loved ones. Too many families are suffering.

Muhammad Hamad’s wife, three of his sons and his sixteen-year-old granddaughter were all killed in a bomb attack on Beit Hanoun in northern Gaza.

Eighteen people were wiped out when Israel hit a house and mosque in the Tuffah neighborhood of Gaza City.

Mohammed Khalaf Awad al-Nawasara was just two years old. His brother, Nidal, was four. They were among a family of four killed when Israel bombed al-Meghazi refugee camp in central Gaza.

Risking their lives

Ambulance drivers are risking their lives to bring victims to hospitals. At least two ambulance crew members have been wounded in eastern Gaza City. There are few other vehicles on the road.

It is Ramadan. Usually during this blessed month, we hear vendors calling out to us from their market stalls. They plead with us to buy treats for the iftar, the meal that ends a day of fasting.

Over the past few days, the marketplaces have been silent.

The silence is overwhelming. People on the street look as if they are attending a funeral, as if they are about to bury their dead. Many faces look pale.

This is the third time in less than six years that Israel has subjected us to an all-out attack.

We are traumatized. We are terrorized.

But we are still here. All 1.8 million of us.

Mahmoud Darwish was right. We will never say “yes” to our invaders. They will never defeat us.

Source
Photo 12, 3, 4 

photojojo:

Charge your phone anytime, anywhere with the power of THE SUN!

The Solio gathers sunshine, and turns it into electricity.

Then, it folds up and fits in the palm of your hand (or your bag) for an on-the-go battery boost.

Power Your Photography with Sunshine

pplanetofsoundd:

Yo no soy curandera porque no uso huevos para curar. No soy curandera porque no doy aguas para tomar. Ni soy hechicera porque no hago la maldad. Mi sabiduría viene desde el lugar donde nace la arena. Yo curo con lenguaje, nada más. Soy sabia, nada más. Soy conocida en los cielos, nada más. Solo soy una que habla con Dios, nada más.

pplanetofsoundd:

Yo no soy curandera porque no uso huevos para curar. 
No soy curandera porque no doy aguas para tomar. 
Ni soy hechicera porque no hago la maldad. 
Mi sabiduría viene desde el lugar donde nace la arena. 
Yo curo con lenguaje, nada más. 
Soy sabia, nada más. Soy conocida en los cielos, nada más. 
Solo soy una que habla con Dios, nada más.

(via neomexicanismos)

detectivegonzalez:

Me cuenta mi señora madre que conoció en persona a doña María Sabina en una charla que dio con interprete en alguna escuela de Teziutlán, Puebla. Qué afortunada mi madre, muchos la hubiesen querido conocer también y ser curados de por vida por la gran shamana oaxaqueña.

detectivegonzalez:

Me cuenta mi señora madre que conoció en persona a doña María Sabina en una charla que dio con interprete en alguna escuela de Teziutlán, Puebla. Qué afortunada mi madre, muchos la hubiesen querido conocer también y ser curados de por vida por la gran shamana oaxaqueña.

(via neomexicanismos)

hotgranola:

La Casa Azul - Museo Frida Kahlo

This is a must see if you visit Mexico City. Walking into the former home of Frida and Diego felt so personal. Her work is already a diary on canvas, so seeing where she lived and created her art was so inspiring. 

Viewing her work up close made me love her paintings even more - so full of pain, color and soul. 

The only thing I know is that I paint because I need to and I paint whatever passes through my head without any further consideration. - Frida Kahlo

(via neomexicanismos)

pushersandpedalers:

sadderdays:

If Latinos Said The Stuff White People Say

no but rly

(via gaspnoway)

Hi I'm Yazmin

23 yrs old

California

Global Studies major